NeedleNerds meet this coming Monday, May 7th, at 7:00 pm

I hope to see you at the Coffee Fever Roasters (7475 Douglas Boulevard) on Monday. We had a great time last month and this month should be more of the same.  Bring a friend and one of your projects!

Also don’t forget that Knit in Public Day is coming up on June 9th.

JD

SHARED: Flickr bought by SmugMug, which vows to revitalize the photo service

I’ve had a Flickr Pro account for several years now, and I’m glad to read this announcement this afternoon. In the last several months I’ve cleaned up my Flickr account and have started taking pictures with my good camera in my quest to become a better photographer. I’ve been uploading my better pictures to my Flickr account, which you can view here.

“SAN FRANCISCO — Flickr has been snapped up by Silicon Valley photo-sharing and storage company SmugMug, USA TODAY has learned.

SmugMug CEO Don MacAskill told USA TODAY he’s committed to breathing new life into the faded social networking pioneer, which hosted photos and lively interactions long before it became trendy.

SmugMug, an independent, family-run company, will maintain Flickr as a standalone community of amateur and professional photographers and give the long neglected service the focus and resources it deserves, MacAskill said in an exclusive interview.”

read more here: SmugMug snaps up Flickr photo service from Verizon’s Oath

SHARED: Facebook knows a ton about your health. Now they want to make money off it. – The Washington Post

I think this is pretty creepy. What do you think?

“Let’s say you like a Facebook page devoted to breast cancer survivors. It has been a useful forum for comparing treatment options with others who have dealt with similar health issues. There’s only one problem: Facebook has now categorized you as a patient, and you constantly receive precisely targeted ads about cancer services available near you. They are showing up on your computer screen at work, for all your co-workers to see, right when you’re up for a big promotion.

Many users experience a version of this scenario when they receive creepily personalized ads while browsing on Facebook. When those ads follow users onto sites outside Facebook, it feels like an invasion of privacy. But how do you regulate data privacy in an age of big-data black boxes?”

Read more here: Facebook knows a ton about your health. Now they want to make money off it. – The Washington Post